Attorney


The Academy of Television Arts & Sciences Foundation Presents

02:26

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Highlights
Dixon Dern on the scope of his duties as legal counsel for CBS
Thomas W. Sarnoff on working in NBC's production and business affairs office and the buidling of the NBC production facility in Burbank, CA
Ruth Engelhardt on what it takes to package a show
Dixon Dern on intellectual property rights involving characters such as the Hardy Boys; the difficulty in determining rights ownership between authors and studios
Who talked about this profession

Dixon Dern

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Dixon Dern on the key to drafting a legal agreement; learning labor law at UPA
Dixon Dern on the scope of his duties as legal counsel for CBS
Dixon Dern on an incident that occured on the set of See It Now ; when someone stole $75,000 worth of equipment and his own life was threatened
Dixon Dern on packaging game shows 
Dixon Dern on intellectual property rights involving characters such as the Hardy Boys; the difficulty in determining rights ownership between authors and studios
Dixon Dern on the creation of the Creative Artists Agency (CAA), which was born out of the departure of Michael Ovitz, Ron Meyers, Mike Rosenfeld, Rollin Perkins, and Bill Haber from the William Morris Agency

Ruth Engelhardt

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Ruth Engelhardt on what it takes to package a show

Thomas W. Sarnoff

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Thomas W. Sarnoff on working in NBC's production and business affairs office and the buidling of the NBC production facility in Burbank, CA

Nina Shaw

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Nina Shaw on important factors for her to secure for a client, and what she was able to negotiate in her American Playhouse deal
Nina Shaw on important factors for her to secure for a client, and what she was able to negotiate in her American Playhouse deal
Nina Shaw on Norman Lear and Bud Yorkin creating the idea of spin-off shows and navigating the corresponding new legal territory
Nina Shaw on her interest in entertainment law and why she chose to work at O'Melveny & Myers in Los Angeles; on there being few African-American lawyers at O'Melveny & Myers when she joined; on working in the entertainment department of O'Melveny & Myers with another African-American lawyer and getting used to there not being many African-American lawyers at that time
Nina Shaw on negotiating talent deals in the 1970s and '80s and how race and gender affected salaries; on negotiating deals for minors
Nina Shaw on starting a firm with Ernie Del and Mike Rubel and on others who wanted to work at the firm; on the firm being a diverse group
Nina Shaw on selecting clientele to represent
Nina Shaw on representing minors
NIna Shaw on how talent agents, managers, and lawyers work together
NIna Shaw on differences between negotiating talent deals for film v. television
NIna Shaw on her negotiating style
NIna Shaw on responding to changes in the industry - media consolidation, etc.
NIna Shaw on negotiating endorsement deals for clients -- as in for Misty Copeland -- and on how the digital world has given people access to talent
NIna Shaw on dealing with infringement of clients' names and likenesses and the impact of right of publicity
NIna Shaw on how the legislation that forbids employers from asking about pay history has impacted the industry
Nina Shaw on her primary responsibility to her clients
Nina Shaw on the formality of attorney/client professional relationships
Nina Shaw on wanting people to see the law as virtuous
Nina Shaw on inclusion riders
Nina Shaw on the diversity at her then-current law firm
Nina Shaw on what makes a good entertainment lawyer
Nina Shaw on what she enjoys about coming to work each day
Nina Shaw on career regrets
Nina Shaw on her proudest career achievements
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