Star Trek


The Academy of Television Arts & Sciences Foundation Presents

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About

With the premiere of Star Trek on NBC in September 1966, few could have imagined that this ambitious yet often uneven science-fiction series would go on to become one of the most actively celebrated and financially lucrative narrative franchises in television history. Although the original series enjoyed only a modest run of three season and 79 episodes, the story world created by that series eventually led to a library of popular novelizations and comic books, a cycle of motion-pictures, an international fan community, and a number of spin-off series that made the Star Trek universe a bedrock property for Paramount Studios in the 1980s and 1990s.

Star Trek followed the adventures of the U.S.S. Enterprise, a flagship in a 23rd-Century interplanetary alliance known as "the Federation." The ship's five year mission was "to seek out new life and new civilizations, to boldly go where no man has gone before," a mandate that series creator and philosophical wellspring Gene Roddenberry described as "Wagon Train in space." Each episode brought the crew of the Enterprise in contact with new alien races or baffling wonders of the universe. When not exploring the galaxy, the crew of the Enterprise often scrapped with the two main threats to the Federation's benevolent democratization of space, the Hun-like Klingons and the more cerebral yet equally menacing Romulans.

The program's main protagonists, Captain James T. Kirk (William Shatner), Mr. Spock (Leonard Nimoy), and Dr. Leonard McCoy (DeForest Kelly) remain three of the most familiar (and most parodied) characters in television memory. As commander of the Enterprise, the hyper-masculine Kirk engaged in equal amounts of fisticuffs and intergalactic romance, and was known for his nerves of steel in negotiating the difficulties and dangers presented by the ship's mission. McCoy was the ship's cantankerous chief medical officer who, when not saving patients, gave the other two leads frequent personal and professional advice. Perhaps most complex and popular of the characters was Spock. Half-human and half-Vulcan, Spock struggled to maintain the absolute emotional control demanded by his Vulcan heritage, and yet occasionally fell prey to the foibles of a more human existence. In addition to the three leads, Star Trek featured a stable of secondary characters who also became central to the show's identity. These included the ship's chief engineer, Scotty (James Doohan), and an ethnically diverse supporting cast featuring Uhura (Nichelle Nichols), Chekov (Walter Koening), Sulu (George Takei), Yeoman Rand (Grace Lee Whitney), and Nurse Chapel (Majel Barrett).

Scripts for the original series varied greatly in quality, ranging from the literate time-travel tragedy of Harlan Ellison's "City on the Edge of Forever" and the Sophoclean conflict of Theodore Sturgeon's "Amok Time," to less inspired stock adventure plots, such as Kirk's battle to the death with a giant lizard creature in "Arena." With varying degree of success, many episodes addressed the social and political climate of late-sixties America, including the Vietnam allegory, "A Private Little War," a rather heavy-handed treatment of racism in "Let That Be Your Last Battlefield," an even an encounter with space hippies in "The Way to Eden."

NBC threatened to cancel Star Trek after its second season, but persuaded in some degree by a large letter-writing campaign by fans to save the show, the network picked up the series for a third and final year. Canceled in 1969, Star Trek went on to a new life in syndication where it found an even larger audience and quickly became a major phenomenon within popular culture. Beginning with a network of memorabilia collectors, fans of the show became increasingly organized, gathering at Star Trek conventions to trade merchandise, meet stars from the show, and watch old episodes. Such fans came to be known as "trekkies," and were noted (and often ridiculed) for their extreme devotion to the show and their encyclopedic knowledge of every episode. Through this explosion of interest, many elements of the Star Trek universe made their way into the larger lexicon of popular culture, including the oft heard line, "Beam me up, Scotty" (a reference to the ship's teleportation device), as well as Spock's signature commentary on the "illogic" of human culture. Along with Spock's distinctively pointed ears, other aspects of Vulcan culture also became widely popularized as television lore, including the Vulcan "mind-meld" and the Vulcan salute, "live long and prosper."

As "trekkie" culture continued to grow around the show during the seventies, a central topic of conversation among fans concerned rumors that the series might one day return to the airwaves. There was talk that the series might return with the original cast, with a new cast, or in a new sequel format. Such rumors were often fueled by a general sense among fans that the show had been unjustly canceled in the first place, and thus deserved a second run. Initially, Paramount did not seem convinced of the commercial potential of resurrecting the story world in any form, but by the late seventies, the studio announced that a motion picture version of the series featuring the original cast was under development. Star Trek: The Motion Picture premiered in 1979, and though it was a very clumsy translation of the series into the language of big-budget, big-screen science-fiction, it proved to be such a hit that Paramount developed a chain of sequels, including Star Trek II: The Wrath of Kahn (1982), Star Trek III: The Search of Spock (1984), and Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home (1986).

By the mid-1980s, the Star Trek mythos had proven so commercially viable that Paramount announced plans for a new Star Trek series for television. Once again supervised by Roddenberry, Star Trek: The Next Generation debuted in first-run syndication in 1987 and went on to become one of the highest rated syndicated shows in history. Set in the 24th century, this series followed the adventures of a new crew on a new Enterprise (earlier versions of the ship having been destroyed in the movie series). The series was extremely successful at establishing a new story world that still maintained a continuity with the premise, spirit, and history of the original series. On the new Enterprise, the command functions were divided between a more cultured Captain, Jean-Luc Picard (Patrick Stewart), and his younger, more headstrong "number one," Commander William Riker (Jonathan Frakes). Spock's character functions were distributed across a number of new crew members, including ship's counselor and Betazoid telepath, Deanna Troi (Marina Sirtis), the highly advanced android, Lt. Commander Data (Brent Spiner), who provided the show with "logical" commentary as ironic counter-point to the peculiarities of human culture, and finally, Lieutenant Worf (Michael Dorn), a Klingon raised by a human family who struggled to reconcile his warrior heritage with the demands of the Federation. Other important characters included Lt. Geordi La Forge (LeVar Burton), the ship's blind engineer whose "vision" was processed by a high-tech visor, Dr. Beverly Crusher (Gates McFadden), the ship's medical officer and implicit romantic foil for Picard, and Wesley Crusher (Wil Wheaton), the doctor's precocious son.

Running for 178 episodes, Star Trek: The Next Generation was able to develop its characters and storylines in much more detail than the original series. As with many other hour-long dramas its era, the series abandoned a wholly episodic format in favor of more serialized narratives that better showcased the expanded ensemble cast. Continuing over the run of the series were recurring encounters with Q, a seemingly omnipotent yet extremely petulant entity, the Borg, a menacing race of mechanized beings, and Lars, Data's "evil" android brother. Other continuing stories included intrigue and civil war in the Klingon empire, Data's ongoing quest to become more fully human, and often volatile political difficulties with the Romulans. This change in the narrative structure of the series from wholly episodic to a more serialized form can be attributed in some part to the activities of the original series' enormous fan following. A central part of fan culture in the 1970s and 1980s involved fans writing their own Star Trek based stories, often filling in blanks left by the original series and elaborating incidents only briefly mentioned in a given episode. Star Trek: The Next Generation greatly expanded the potential for such creative elaboration by presenting a more complex storyworld, one that actively encouraged the audience to think of the series as a foundation for imagining a larger textual universe.

Despite the show's continuing success, Paramount canceled Star Trek: The Next Generation after seven seasons to turn the series into a film property and make room for new television spin-offs, thus beginning a careful orchestration of the studio's Star Trek interests in both film and television. The cast of the original series returned to the theater for Star Treks 5 and 6, leading finally to Star Trek: Generations, in which the original cast turned over the cinematic baton to the crew of Next Generation. Star Trek: Deep Space Nine premiered in January of 1993 as the eventual replacement for Next Generation on television. In contrast to the usually optimistic and highly mobile structure of the first two series, Deep Space Nine was a much more claustrophobic reading of the Star Trek universe. Set aboard an aging space-station in orbit around a recently liberated planet, Bajor, the series generated its storylines from the aftermath of the war over Bajor and from a nearby "wormhole" that brought diverse travelers to the station from across the galaxy.

Hoping to compete with Fox and Warner Brothers in creating new broadcast networks, Paramount developed a fourth Star Trek series as the anchor for their United Paramount Network. Star Trek: Voyager inaugurated UPN in January 1995, serving as he network's first broadcast. Responding perhaps to the stagebound qualities and tepid reception of Deep Space Nine, Voyager opted for a premise that maximized the crew's ability to travel and encounter new adventures. Stranded in a distant part of the galaxy after a freak plasma storm, the U.S.S. Voyager finds itself seventy-five years away from earth and faced with the arduous mission of returning home.

Both Deep Space Nine and Voyager attracted the core fans of Star Trek, as expected, but neither series was as popular with the public at large as the programs they were designed to replace. Despite this, at century's end, there would seem to be every indication that the world of Star Trek will survive into the new millennium.

-Jeffrey Sconce

CAST

Captain James T. Kirk ...........................William Shatner

Mr. Spock.............................................. Leonard Nimoy

Dr. Leonard McCoy ...............................DeForest Kelley

Yeoman Janice Rand (1966-1967)..... Grace Lee Whitney

Sulu .........................................................George Takei

Uhura................................................... Nichelle Nichols

Engineer Montgomery Scott..................... James Doohan

Nurse Christine Chapel............................... Majel Barrett

Ensign Pavel Chekov (1967-1969)............. Walter Koenig

PRODUCERS

Gene Roddenberry, John Meredyth Lucas, Gene L. Coon, Fred Freiberger

PROGRAMMING HISTORY

79 Episodes

NBC

September 1966-August 1967   Thursday 8:30-9:30

September 1967-August 1968   Friday 8:30-9:30

September 1968-April 1969   Friday 10:00-11:00

June 1969-September 1969   Tuesday 7:30-8:30

FURTHER READING

Alexander, David, and Ray Bradbury. Star Trek Creator: The Authorized Biography of Gene Roddenberry. New York: Roc, 1994.

Asherman, Allan. The Star Trek Compendium. New York: Pocket, 1989.

Dillard, J. M., and Susan Sackett. Star Trek, Where No One Has Gone Before: A History in Pictures. New York: Pocket, 1994.

Gerrold, David. The World of Star Trek. New York, Ballantine, 1974.

Gibberman, Susan R. Star Trek: An Annotated Guide to Resources On The Development, The Phenomenon, The People, The Television Series, The Films, The Novels, and The Recordings. Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland, 1991.

Jenkins, Henry. Textual Poachers: Television Fans and Participatory Culture. New York: Routledge, 1992.

Nemecek, Larry. The Star Trek: The Next Generation Companion. New York: Pocket, 1992.

Okuda, Michael, Denise Okuda, Debbie Mirek, and Doug Drexler. The Star Trek Encyclopedia: A Reference Guide to The Future. New York: Pocket, 1994.

Shatner, William, with Chris Kreski. Star Trek Memories. New York: Harper Collins, 1993.

Trimble, Bjo. The Star Trek Concordance. New York: Ballantine, 1976.

Tulloch, John, and Jenkins, Henry. Science Fiction Audiences: Watching Doctor Who and Star Trek. London; New York: Routledge, 1995.

Van Hise, James, and Hal Schuster. Trek, The Unauthorized Story Of The Movies. Las Vegas, Nevada: Pioneer Books, 1995.

Whitfield, Stephen E., and Gene Roddenberry. The Making Of Star Trek. New York, Ballantine, 1968.

Highlights
Nichelle Nichols on the famous Star Trek scene where her character kisses William Shatner's character
George Takei on the character of Mr. Sulu on Star Trek
05:31
William Shatner on his Star Trek character "Captain James T. Kirk"
05:56
Richard Matheson on writing the Star Trek episode "The Enemy Within"
01:55
Ricardo Montalban on his role of Khan in Star Trek and in the feature film Star Trek: The Wrath of Khan
05:25
Joseph M. Wilcots on doing visual effects for Star Trek
05:45
Nichelle Nichols on the legacy of Star Trek
Alexander Courage on how he composed the theme music for Star Trek
01:08
Who talked about this show

Howard Anderson, Jr.

View Interview
Howard Anderson Jr. on creating the opening sequence for Star Trek
04:10
Howard Anderson Jr. on creating the opening titles and special effects for Star Trek  (Part 1)
08:01
Howard Anderson Jr. on creating special effects and titles for Star Trek
04:19
Howard Anderson Jr. on working with Gene Roddenberry on Star Trek
01:23
Howard Anderson Jr. on creating special effects for Star Trek
04:03
Howard Anderson Jr. on the biggest challenge of creating Star Trek special effects
04:01
Howard Anderson Jr. on creating the effects for the different planets on Star Trek
01:52
Howard Anderson Jr. on working with the cast and crew of Star Trek
02:08
Howard Anderson Jr. on the legacy of his work on Star Trek
00:59

Harve Bennett

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Harve Bennett on how he came to produce the Star Trek  features
04:11
Harve Bennett on choosing "Khan" as the villain for the feature "Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan"
01:58
Harve Bennett on the cast of Star Trek
03:02
Harve Bennett on killing off "Spock" in the feature film "Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan"
02:20

Rick Berman

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Rick Berman on the then-future of the Star Trek franchise
01:16
Rick Berman on the legacy of Star Trek
01:44
Rick Berman on the future of the Star Trek  franchise
01:16

Robert Blackman

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Robert Blackman on designing costumes for Star Trek: Enterprise
08:15
Robert Blackman on designing costumes for the "Star Trek" feature films
02:58
Robert Blackman on the legacy of Star Trek
00:42

LeVar Burton

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LeVar Burton on being a fan of Star Trek and Gene Roddenberry
00:42

Robert Butler

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Robert Butler on directing the original pilot of Star Trek  ("The Cage")
06:59

Leo Chaloukian

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Leo Chaloukian on doing sound for the Star Trek pilot
01:59

Alexander Courage

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Alexander Courage on creating the main title sound effects for the Enterprise on Star Trek
01:00
Alexander Courage on creating the fanfare for the main title on Star Trek
01:33
Alexander Courage on how he was asked to write the theme music for Star Trek
02:58
Alexander Courage on how he composed the theme music for Star Trek
01:08
Alexander Courage on creating the sound effects for the alien planet on Star Trek
01:08
Alexander Courage on music for the second Star Trek pilot, "Where No Man Has Gone Before" 
01:54
Alexander Courage on music for the original Star Trek pilot "The Cage" and his initial thoughts on the show
02:30
Alexander Courage on the recording session for the music for the original Star Trek pilot "The Cage" and the show's main titles
03:46
Alexander Courage on the inspiration for the Star Trek theme and playing it for Gene Roddenberry
01:44
Alexander Courage on scoring two episodes of Star Trek during its first season and deciding to work on the film "Dr. Doolittle" rather than stay with Star Trek
03:34
Alexander Courage on the deterioration of his relationship with Gene Roddenberry over royalities
02:15
Alexander Courage on scoring additional episodes of Star Trek during the show's third season
01:14
Alexander Courage on not being asked to score the Star Trek movie
01:25
Alexander Courage on scoring many episodes of Lost in Space and wishing he had stayed at Star Trek
01:08
Alexander Courage on the highlight of his career - Star Trek (and his experience at a convention)
01:18

Elinor Donahue

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Elinor Donahue on guest starring on the Star Trek episode "Metamorphosis" (airdate: November 10, 1967)
05:37

Gerald Perry Finnerman

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Gerald Finnerman on working with Star Trek's Gene Roddenberry and Robert Justman
06:37
Gerald Finnerman on being hired as cinematographer on Star Trek
05:32
Cinematographer Gerald Finnerman on first working with the sets of Star Trek
06:11
Cinematographer Gerald Finnerman on working on the first season of Star Trek
15:45
Gerald Finnerman on working with the cast and crew of Star Trek
28:29
Gerald Finnerman on being director of photography on specific episodes of Star Trek
20:41

Dorothy Fontana

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Dorothy Fontana on the Star Trek episode "Friday's Child", over which she argued with Gene Rodenberry about the portrayal of women; she had a different ending
01:55
Dorothy Fontana on her favorite Star Trek episode "Journey to Babel" about Spock's parents
01:28
Dorothy Fontana on the original concept and vision of Star Trek, the pilot process, and the sale of the series to NBC
04:58
Dorothy Fontana on Star Trek's production schedule and how the series was initially picked up
03:15
Dorothy Fontana on Star Trek's initial production crew and on developing the look of the series and of the starship
03:36
Dorothy Fontana on Star Trek's creation of aliens using "the Horta" from "The Devil in the Dark" episode as an example
01:52
Dorothy Fontana on the technology used in Star Trek's world
02:41
Dorothy Fontana on the casting of Star Trek; on her duties on the series; on being promoted to story editor; on working with the writers
08:30
Dorothy Fontana on the direction given to Star Trek writers; on writing a television script; the minimal censorship issues; working with Gene Roddenberry
08:30
Dorothy Fontana on the cast of Star Trek and their characters
10:31
Dorothy Fontana on the Star Trek episode "Charlie X"
01:41
Dorothy Fontana on the Star Trek episode "This Side of Paradise", which elevated her to story editor on the series
02:04
Dorothy Fontana on her least-favorite episode of Star Trek; Klingons; on Gene Roddenberry's "Great Bird of the Galaxy" nickname
02:11

Gerald Fried

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Composer Gerald Fried on his work on Star Trek (including his work on the episodes "Shore Leave", "Cat's Paw", "Amok Time", "The Paradise Syndrome")
14:03
Gerald Fried on demonstrations of some of his compositions from Star Trek
03:08

Leslie Hoffman

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Leslie Hoffman on Star Trek conventions
01:39

James Hong

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James Hong on running into George Takei when they were both interviewing for Star Trek's Sulu
01:33

Joseph Jennings

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Joseph Jennings on the biggest challenges of preparing for a show as an art director and on doing art direction for science fiction shows including Star Trek
03:39
Joseph Jennings on planning the art direction for the first "Star Trek" feature film
04:26
Joseph Jennings on acting as art director for Star Trek
01:42
Joseph Jennings on creator Gene Roddenberry's input on the art direction of Star Trek and on the "logic" of science fiction 
03:14
Joseph Jennings on creating his vision of the future on Star Trek
06:12
Joseph Jennings on working within the constraints of Star Trek's budget and on memorable designs and episodes for Star Trek
02:42

George Clayton Johnson

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George Clayton Johnson on Gene Roddenberry's vision for Star Trek and how Roddenberry was inspired by the program Wagon Train
12:34
George Clayton Johnson on the Star Trek episode he wrote, "The Man Trap," being the premiere episode 
03:42
George Clayton Johnson on how he came to write for Star Trek 
09:13
George Clayton Johnson on the early storylines and character ideas for Star Trek
02:26
George Clayton Johnson on Star Trek creator Gene Roddenberry; on Roddenberry rewriting his work
16:32
George Clayton Johnson on the nickname "Bones" on Star Trek
01:20
George Clayton Johnson on race relations on Star Trek
01:23
George Clayton Johnson on the set of the Starship Enterprise on Star Trek
03:06
George Clayton Johnson on Star Trek Associate Producer Robert Justman
01:25
George Clayton Johnson on coming up with the story for the Star Trek episode "Rock-a-Bye Baby Or Die", which Gene Coon did not want to produce
04:56
George Clayton Johnson on arguments he had over storyline with the producers of Star Trek
03:22
George Clayton Johnson on the legacy of Star Trek
02:30

Robert Justman

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Robert Justman on working on the Mission: Impossible pilot and the Star Trek pilots
09:46
Associate producer Robert Justman on the development of Star Trek
15:24
Associate producer Robert Justman on the props created for Star Trek
03:19
Robert Justman on working with the cast and crew of Star Trek; on various episodes of the series
27:31
Robert Justman on "The City of the Edge of Forever" episode of Star Trek
02:27
Robert Justman on "The Menagerie" episode of Star Trek
02:16
Robert Justman on some notable episodes of Star Trek; on leaving the series
15:37

Walter Koenig

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Walter Koenig on acting in Star Trek: The Motion Picture directed by Robert Wise
02:50
Walter Koenig on being cast as "Pavel Chekov" on Star Trek and making the character Russian
07:24
Walter Koenig on the development of his character "Pavel Chekov" on Star Trek
04:33
Walter Koenig on the personality of his character "Pavel Chekov" on Star Trek and his relationship with "Captain Kirk"
01:49
Walter Koenig on the look of his Star Trek character "Pavel Chekov"
01:17
Walter Koenig on the challenge of coming into Star Trek in season 2 and dealing with special effects and props
05:22
Walter Koenig on working with the different personalities on Star Trek
04:36
Walter Koenig on the filming of Star Trek
01:21
Walter Koenig on the reasons Star Trek's iconic status
05:48
Walter Koenig on working with Star Trek producer Robert Justman
00:52
Walter Koenig on working with various people on Star Trek
08:46
Walter Koenig on his favorite episodes of Star Trek
05:54
Walter Koenig on Gene Roddenberry leaving Star Trek
01:47
Walter Koenig on playing a Russian character on Star Trek
01:39
Walter Koenig on the financial aspects of being on Star Trek
04:35
Walter Koenig on attending Star Trek conventions
02:38
Walter Koenig on the legacy of Star Trek
04:21

Sid Krofft

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Sid and Marty Krofft on the writers on Land of the Lost coming from Star Trek
00:33

Marty Krofft

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Sid and Marty Krofft on the writers on Land of the Lost coming from Star Trek
00:33

Richard Matheson

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Richard Matheson on writing the Star Trek episode "The Enemy Within"
01:55

Ricardo Montalban

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Ricardo Montalban on his role of Khan in Star Trek and in the feature film Star Trek: The Wrath of Khan
05:25

Diana Muldaur

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Diana Muldaur on working on Star Trek
05:15

Nichelle Nichols

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Nichelle Nichols on being cast on Star Trek
Nichelle Nichols describes her character "Uhura" on Star Trek; how the studio didn't want a black female character on the series; it wasn't in the original script
Nichelle Nichols on what her character's name "Uhura" meant in Swahili - freedom
Nichelle Nichols on how Star Trek's "Uhura's" name came about 
03:26
Nichelle Nichols on the third season of Star Trek; the production schedule; changes in her role;
Nichelle Nichols on Star Trek fan favorite "The City on the Edge of Forever"
Nichelle Nichols on Star Trek fan favorite "Plato's Stepchildren"
Nichelle Nichols on the famous Star Trek scene where her character kisses William Shatner's character
Nichelle Nichols on the legacy of Star Trek

Leonard Nimoy

View Interview
Leonard Nimoy on his creation of the Vulcan nerve pinch
02:08
Leonard Nimoy on auditioning and winning a guest part on The Lieutenant, which led him to be cast on Star Trek
02:30
Leonard Nimoy on Marc Daniels directing him in his last TV guest role (on Gunsmoke) before they collaborated on Star Trek
00:31
Leonard Nimoy on working with William Shatner on The Man From U.N.C.L.E. previous to Star Trek, but not interacting much with him
00:27
Leonard Nimoy on getting cast on Star Trek (after submitting an episode of Dr. Kildare to show his "range" to producer/creator Gene Roddenberry)
03:03
Leonard Nimoy on his make-up as Star Trek's "Mr. Spock" and how it eventually gravitated toward a "cooler, more controlled" look
01:47
Leonard Nimoy on his discover that the original marketing campaign of Star Trek tried to de-emphasize Spock's "devilish" look
02:31
Leonard Nimoy on the "Spock" character's inclusion being questioned within a network television system that relied on the norm
01:28
Leonard Nimoy on the premise of Star Trek
01:44
Leonard Nimoy on how Star Trek was useful as a platform for its writers
00:31
Leonard Nimoy on what he was told about lead Jeffrey Hunter's departure following the initial pilot of Star Trek
01:16
Leonard Nimoy on his Star Trek character "Mr. Spock"
04:50
Leonard Nimoy on developing his Star Trek character "Mr. Spock" and an important "note" he received from a series director (which has been attributed to Joseph Sargent)
01:39
Leonard Nimoy in the precedent of the "Spock" character in Michael Rennie's "Klaatu" from The Day the Earth Stood Still
00:55
Leonard Nimoy on being influenced in his Star Trek "Mr. Spock" characterization by something he saw Harry Belafonte do on stage circa the 1950s
01:45
Leonard Nimoy on abandoning an actor's "emotion" as a requirement for playing "Mr. Spock" and how playing "Spock" effected him personally
01:27
Leonard Nimoy on his Star Trek character "Mr. Spock's" trademark eyebrow arching
00:40
Leonard Nimoy on his typical workweek on Star Trek
02:43
Leonard Nimoy on Star Trek's "transporter"
01:01
Leonard Nimoy on Star Trek's bridge set
01:02
Leonard Nimoy on Star Trek's restrictive budget
01:01
Leonard Nimoy on Lucille Ball saying hello in the commissary to him during the run of Star Trek (which was being produced by her studio Desilu)
00:27
Leonard Nimoy on the directors of Star Trek and the tight adherence to schedule
01:50
Leonard Nimoy on how he and William Shatner expressed interest in directing for Star Trek, but the opportunity wasn't offered
00:52
Leonard Nimoy on being firm with script notes despite the pressures of TV production on Star Trek
00:50
Leonard Nimoy compares the shooting schedule of Star Trek to "sister series" Mission:Impossible
00:56
Leonard Nimoy on Star Trek creator/producer Gene Roddenberry's involvement during the show's run and vision for the series
01:36
Leonard Nimoy on Star Trek writer/producer Gene L. Coon and his idea of the Klingons
01:34
Leonard Nimoy on Star Trek associate producer Robert Justman
01:04
Leonard Nimoy on "McCoy" and "Spock" representing the humanist and rational sides of "Capt. Kirk" on Star Trek
01:35
Leonard Nimoy on working with the ensemble cast of Star Trek: DeForest Kelley, James Doohan, Nichelle Nichols, George Takei, Walter Koenig
02:32
Leonard Nimoy on working with Star Trek co-star William Shatner (in comparison to pilot episode co-star Jeffrey Hunter)
01:00
Leonard Nimoy on Star Trek's popularity and the network's mismanaging of its timeslot, which hastened its cancellation
01:24
Leonard Nimoy on the Star Trek episode "The Devil in the Dark," and "Spock's" mind meld ability
02:11
Leonard Nimoy on his creation of the Vulcan salute and its use in the episode "Amok Time"
01:51
Leonard Nimoy on his favorite and least favorite episodes of Star Trek
01:27
Leonard Nimoy on being Emmy-nominated for all three seasons of Star Trek, yet never winning due to his belief that there's a prejudice against awarding performances in the science fiction genre
01:28
Leonard Nimoy on the legacy of Star Trek
01:16
Leonard Nimoy compares his two '60s series: Star Trek and Mission:Impossible in terms of approach to the written word
00:39
Leonard Nimoy on having more "down time" on Mission:Impossible versus Star Trek during shooting
00:57
Leonard Nimoy on how the quality of the screenplay for the feature film Star Trek—The Motion Picture mirrored the poor quality of the writing on the third and last season of the original Star Trek series
02:02
Leonard Nimoy on an idea he came up with to inject some humor into the final scene of Star Trek—The Motion Picture, which was not used
01:22
Leonard Nimoy on the video release of Star Trek—The Motion Picture (1979), which included previously cut material
00:21
Leonard Nimoy on the "death" of Spock in the Star Trek feature films and on getting an opportunity to direct two of them
00:33
Leonard Nimoy on his reaction to being Emmy-nominated for Star Trek
00:26
Leonard Nimoy on his satisfaction with the positive response to the feature film Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home
00:59

Hank Rieger

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Hank Rieger on publicity for Star Trek and the protests over the show's cancellation
04:44

Joseph Sargent

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Joseph Sargent on explaining how to play "Spock" to Leonard Nimoy
02:01
Joseph Sargent on directing Star Trek
03:04
Joseph Sargent on Clint Howard guest-starring on Star Trek
01:03
Joseph Sargent on Star Trek fans
00:41

William Schallert

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William Schallert on appearing on the Star Trek episode "The Trouble with Tribbles"
03:14
William Schallert on being remembered for working on Star Trek
00:46

Herbert S. Schlosser

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Herbert S. Schlosser on programming and developing Star Trek
05:19

Ralph Senensky

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Ralph Senensky on directing six episodes of Star Trek
03:04
Ralph Senensky on directing the "Metamorphosis" episode of Star Trek
00:41
Ralph Senensky on directing the "Obsession" episode of Star Trek
01:08
Ralph Senensky on directing the "Return to Tomorrow" episode of Star Trek
02:16
Ralph Senensky on directing the "Bread and Circuses" episode of Star Trek
02:00
Ralph Senensky on controversy over a prop when directing the "Is There No Truth in Beauty?" episode of Star Trek
02:14
Ralph Senensky on directing "The Tholian Web" episode of Star Trek
04:14
Ralph Senensky on directing the cast of Star Trek; on the legacy of the show
05:38

William Shatner

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William Shatner on being cast by Gene Roddenberry as "Captain James T. Kirk" on Star Trek, and on his input into the character and the stories
04:08
William Shatner on his Star Trek character "Captain James T. Kirk"
05:56
William Shatner on filming a typical episode of Star Trek, and on Gene Roddenberry's role in the production of the series
02:15
William Shatner on how he felt about the success of Star Trek
02:18
William Shatner on the directors of Star Trek including Vincent McEveety, Leo Penn, Marc Daniels, James Goldstone, Michael O'Hurlihy, and Herschel Daugherty
02:42
William Shatner on the process of playing "Captain James T. Kirk" on Star Trek, and on producers Gene Roddenberry and Gene Coon guiding the show
04:06
William Shatner on Leonard Nimoy as "Mr. Spock" on Star Trek
00:41
William Shatner on DeForest Kelley as "Dr. Leonard McCoy" and James Doohan as "Mr. Scott" on Star Trek
00:53
William Shatner on the popularity of Star Trek after it was cancelled
00:39
William Shatner on individual episodes of Star Trek
01:51
William Shatner on his awareness of the Star Trek phenomenon, and the reasons for its popularity
03:59
William Shatner on the message and themes of Star Trek, and on "Captain Kirk" as role model
04:59
William Shatner on on directing "Star Trek: The Final Frontier", and how he feels about directing
02:56

Herbert F. Solow

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Herbert F. Solow on how he first heard about Star Trek
03:22
Herbert F. Solow on the development process for Star Trek and initial hurdles which occurred and how it became a pilot
08:43
Herbert F. Solow on the two pilots for Star Trek and how it became a series
18:52
Herbert F. Solow on casting for Star Trek
22:46
Herbert F. Solow on his favorite episode of Star Trek
00:40

Fred Steiner

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Fred Steiner on composing for Star Trek and on specific episodes
17:23
Fred Steiner on scoring specific episodes of Star Trek
13:45

George Takei

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George Takei on being cast on Star Trek as "Mr. Sulu"
03:09
George Takei on his favorite Star Trek episode "Naked Time"
06:13
George Takei on the character of Mr. Sulu on Star Trek
05:31
George Takei on working with the special effects, props and costumes on Star Trek
05:00
George Takei on Gene Roddenberry and Star Trek's commentary on American society at the time
05:32
George Takei on working with Star Trek colleagues James Doohan, Nichele Nicols, and Walter Koenig
06:24
George Takei on the Star Trek episode "Mirror, Mirror"
02:03
George Takei on Star Trek going off the air and its legacy and his character's legacy
05:29
George Takei on Gene Roddenberry's last appearance at the Star Trek 25th anniversary convention
01:55

Joseph M. Wilcots

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Joseph M. Wilcots on how the Star Trek transporter effects were created in post-production
03:19
Joseph M. Wilcots on how the Star Trek phaser effects were created in post-production
00:53
Joseph M. Wilcots on how the various Star Trek effects were created in post-production; working with Gene Roddenberry; creating effects depicting the ship
05:57
Joseph M. Wilcots on doing visual effects for Star Trek
05:45
Joseph M. Wilcots on working with Gene Roddenberry on Star Trek
01:57
Joseph M. Wilcots on shooting models for the visual effects on Star Trek, and on how they held up over the years
02:21

Jane Wyatt

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Jane Wyatt on her work as "Spock's mother" on Star Trek
01:30
Jane Wyatt on her work on Star Trek contd. and fan mail she receives; on attending Star Trek conventions
01:26

Leo Yoshimura

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Leo Yoshimura on playing "Sulu" in several Star Trek parodies on Saturday Night Live over the years
06:08

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