M*A*S*H


The Academy of Television Arts & Sciences Foundation Presents

02:26

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About

M*A*S*H, based on the movie of the same name (Director Robert Altman, 1970), aired on CBS from 1972-1983 and has become one of the most celebrated television series in the history of the medium. During its initial season, however, M*A*S*H was in danger of being canceled due to low ratings. The show reached the top ten program list the following year, and never fell out of the top twenty rated programs during the remainder of its run. The final episode of M*A*S*H was a two and one half hour special that attracted the largest audience to ever view a single television program episode.

In many was the series set the standard for some of the best programming to appear later. The show used multiple plotlines in a half-hour episodes, usually with at least one story in the comedic vein and another dramatic. Some later versions of this form, e.g. Hooperman (ABC 1987-1989) and The Days and Nights of Molly Dodd (NBC 1987-1989), would be known as the dramady, half-hour programs incorporating elements of both comedy and drama. Other comedies would forego the more serious aspects of M*A*S*H, but maintain its focus on character and motive. And some dramatic programming, such as St. Elsewhere and Moonlighting, would draw on the mixture of elements to distinguish themselves from more conventional television.

M*A*S*H was set in South Korea, near Seoul, during the Korean War. The series focused on the group of doctors and nurses whose job was to heal the wounded who arrived at this "Mobile Army Surgical Hospital" by helicopter, ambulance or bus. The hospital compound was isolated from the rest of the world. One road ran through the camp; a mountain blocked one perimeter and a minefield the other. Here the wounded were patched up and sent home--or back to the front. Here, too, the loyal audience came to know and respond to an exceptional ensemble cast of characters.

The original cast assumed roles created in Altman's movie. The protagonists were Dr. Benjamin Franklin "Hawkeye" Pierce (Alan Alda) and Dr. "Trapper" John McIntyre (Wayne Rogers). Pierce and McIntyre were excellent surgeons who preferred to chase female nurses and drink homemade gin to operating and who had little, if any use for military discipline or authority. As a result, they often ran afoul of two other medical officers, staunch military types, Dr. Frank Burns (Larry Linville) and Senior Nurse, Lieutenant Margaret "Hot Lips" Houlihan (Loretta Swit). The camp commander, Lt. Col. Henry Blake (McLean Stevenson), was a genial bumbler whose energies were often directed toward preventing Burns and Houlihan from court martialing Pierce and McIntyre. The camp was actually run by Corporal Walter "Radar" O'Reilly (Gary Burghoff), the company clerk who could spontaneously finish Blake's unspoken sentences and hear incoming helicopters before they were audible to other human ears. Other regulars were Corporal Max Klinger (Jamie Farr) who, in the early seasons, usually dressed in women's clothing in an ongoing attempt to secure a medical (mental) discharge, and Father Francis Mulcahy (William Christopher), the kindly camp priest who looked out for an orphanage.

In the course of its eleven years the series experienced many cast changes. McIntyre was "discharged" after the 1974-75 season because of a contract dispute between the producers and Rogers. He was replaced by Dr. B.J. Hunnicutt (Mike Farrell), a clean cut family man quite different from Pierce's lecherous doctor. Frank Burns was given a psychiatric discharge in the beginning of the 1977-78 season and was replaced by Dr. Charles Emerson Winchester (David Ogden Stiers), a Boston blueblood who disdained the condition of the camp and tent mates Pierce and Hunnicutt. O'Reilly's departure at the beginning of the 1979-80 season was explained by the death of his fictional uncle, and Klinger took over the company clerk position.

Perhaps the most significant change for the group occurred with the leave-taking of Henry Blake. His exit was written into the series in tragic fashion. As his plane was flying home over the Sea of Japan it was shot down and the character killed. Despite the "realism" of this narrative development, public sentiment toward the event was so negative that the producers promised never to have another character depart the same way. Colonel Sherman Potter (Harry Morgan), a doctor with a regular Army experience in the cavalry, replaced Blake as camp commander and became more both more complex and more involved with the other characters than Blake had been.

Though the series was set in Korea, M*A*S*H, both the movie and the series, was initially developed as a critique of the Vietnam War. As that war dragged toward conclusion, however, the series focused more on characters than situations--a major development for situation comedy. Characters were given room to learn from their mistakes, to adapt and change. Houlihan became less the rigid military nurse and more a friend to both her subordinates and the doctors. Pierce changed from a gin-guzzling skirt chaser to a more "enlightened" male who cares about women and their issues, a reflection of Alda himself. O'Reilly outgrew his youthful innocence, and Klinger gave up his skirts and wedding dresses to assume more authority. This focus on character rather than character type set M*A*S*H apart from other comedies of the day and the style of the show departed from the norm in many other ways as well, both in terms of its style and its mode of production.

While most other contemporary sitcoms took place indoors and were largely produced on videotape in front of a live audience, M*A*S*H was shot entirely on film on location in Southern California. Outdoor shooting at times presented problems. While shooting the final episode, for example, forest fires destroyed the set, causing a delay in filming. The series also made innovative uses of the laugh track. In early seasons, the laugh track was employed during the entire episode. As the series developed, the laugh track was removed from scenes that occurred in the operating room. In a few episodes, the laugh track was removed entirely, another departure from sitcom conventions.

The most striking technical aspect of the series is found in its aggressively cinematic visual style. Instead of relying on straight cuts and short takes episodes often used long shots with people and vehicles moving between the characters and the camera. Tracking shots moved with action, and changed direction when the story was "handed off" from one group of characters to another. These and other camera movements, wedded to complex editing techniques, enabled the series to explore character psychology in powerful ways, and to assert the preeminence of the ensemble over any single individual. In this way M*A*S*H seemed to be asserting the central fact of war, that individual human beings are caught in the tangled mesh of other lives and there must struggle to retain some sense of humanity and compassion. This approach was grounded in Altman's film style and enabled M*A*S*H to manipulate its multiple story lines and its mixture of comedy and drama with techniques that matched the complex, absurd tragedy of war itself.

M*A*S*H was one of the most innovative sitcoms of the 1970s and 1980s. Its stylistic flair and narrative mix drew critical acclaim, while the solid writing and vitally drawn characters helped the series maintain high ratings. The show also made stars of it performers, none more so than Alda, who went on to a successful career in film. The popularity of M*A*S*H was quite evident in the 1978-79 season. CBS aired new episodes during primetime on Monday and programmed reruns of the series in the daytime and on Thursday late night, giving the show a remarkable seven appearances on a single network in a five day period. The series produced one unsuccessful spin-off, After M*A*S*H, which aired from 1983-84. The true popularity of M*A*S*H can still be seen, for the series is one of the most widely syndicated series throughout the world. Despite the historical setting, the characters and issues in this series remain fresh, funny and compelling in ways that continue to stand as excellent television.

-Jeff Shires

CAST

Capt. Benjamin Franklin Pierce (Hawkeye)....... Alan Alda  

Capt. John McIntyre (Trapper John)(1972-1975)...... Wayne Rogers

Maj. Margaret Houlilhan (Hot Lips)................ Loretta Swit  

Maj. Frank Burns (1972-1977)...................... Larry Linville  

Cpl. Walter O Reilly (Radar) (1972-1979)..... Gary Burghoff  

Lt. Col. Henry Blake (1972-1975)........ McLean Stevenson

Father John Mulcahy (pilot only).............. George Morgan

Father Francis Mulcahy.................... William Christopher

Cpl. Maxwell Klinger (1973-1983) ....................Jamie Farr

Col. Sherman Potter (1975-1983) ...............Harry Morgan  

Capt. B.J. Hunnicut (1975-1983)................... Mike Farrell  

Maj. Charles Emerson Winchester (1977-1983)..........David Ogden Stiers  

Lt. Maggie Dish (1972) ...............................Karen Philipp

Spearchucker Jones (1972)..................... Timothy Brown  

Ho-John (1972)....................................... Patrick Adiarte  

Ugly John (1972-1973)............................... John Orchard  

Lt. Leslie Scorch (1972-1973)................ Linda Meiklejohn  

Gen. Brandon Clayton (1972-1973)............... Herb Voland

Lt. Ginger Ballis (1972-1974)............... Odessa Cleveland  

Nurse Margie Cutler (1972-1973)......... Marcia Strassman

Nurse Louise Anderson (1973) .............Kelly Jean Peters

Lt. Nancy Griffin (1973)........................... Lynette Mettey

Various Nurses (1973-1977).................... Bobbie Mitchell  

Gen. Mitchell (1973-1974)...................... Robert F. Simon  

Nurse Kellye (1974-1983)...................... Kellye Nakahara  

Various Nurses (1974-1978)................... Patricia Stevens

Various Nurses (1976-1983)......................... Judy Farrell  

Igor (1976-1983)......................................... Jeff Maxwell  

Nurse Bigelow (1977-1979).............................. Enid Kent

Sgt. Zale (1977-1979)............................. Johnny Haymer

Various Nurses (1978-1983)........................... Jan Jordan

Various Nurses (1979-1983)........................ Gwen Farrell

Various Nurses (1979-1981)......................... Connie Izay

Various Nurses (1979-1980) ......................Jennifer Davis  

Various Nurses (1980-1983) ..........................Shari Sabo Sgt.

Luther Rizzo (1981-1983).................... G. W. Bailey  

Roy (1981-1983)....................................... Roy Goldman

Soon-Lee (1983)...................................... Rosalind Chao  

Various Nurses (1981-1983).................. Joann Thompson  

Various Nurses (1992-1983).................. Deborah Harmon

PRODUCERS      

Larry Gelbart, Gene Reynolds, Burt Metcalfe, John Rappaport, Allan Katz, Don Reo, Jim Mulligan, Thad Mumford, Dan Wilcox, Dennis Koenig

PROGRAMMING HISTORY

251 Episodes

CBS

September 1972-September 1973   Sunday 8:00-8:30

September 1973-September 1974   Saturday 8:30-9:00

September 1974-September 1975   Tuesday 8:30-9:00

September 1975-November 1975   Friday 8:30-9:00

December 1975-January 1978   Tuesday 9:00-9:30

January 1978-September 1983   Monday 9:00-9:30

FURTHER READING

Alda, Arlene, and Alan Alda. The Last Days Of M*A*S*H. Verona, New Jersey: Unicorn, 1983.

Budd, Mike, and Clay Steinman. "M*A*S*H Mystified: Capitalization, Dematerialization, Idealization." Cultural Critique (New York), Fall 1988.

Clauss, Jed. M*A*S*H, The First Five Years, 1972-1977: A Show By Show Arrangement. Mattituck, New York: Aeonian, 1977.

Dennison, Linda T. "In the Beginning .... (interview with Larry Gelbart)." Writer's Digest (Indianapolis, Indiana), April 1995.

Freedman, Carl. "History, Fiction, Film, Television, Myth: The Ideology of M*A*S*H." The Southern Review (Baton Rouge, Louisiana), Winter 1990.

Heard, A. "The M*A*S*H Era." The New Republic (Washington, D.C.), 4 April 1983.

Kalter, Suzy. The Complete Book Of M*A*S*H. Introduction by Larry Gelbart. New York: Abrams, 1984.

Marc, David. "The World of Alda and 'Hawkeye.'" Television Quarterly (New York), Fall 1988.

Reiss, David S. M*A*S*H: The Exclusive, Inside Story of TV's Most Popular Show. Foreword by Alan Alda. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1983.

Sawyer, Corinne Holt. "'If I Could Walk That Way, I Wouldn't Need the Talcum Powder': Word-Play Humor in M*A*S*H." Journal of Popular Film and Television (Bowling Green, Ohio), Spring 1983.

_______________. "Kilroy Was Here--But He Stepped Out for a Minute! Absentee Characters in Popular Fiction (With Particular Attention To M*A*S*H)." Journal of Popular Culture (Bowling Green, Ohio), Fall 1984.

Winther, Marjorie. "M*A*S*H, Malls and Meaning: Popular and Corporate Culture in In Country." Lit: Literature Interpretation Theory (New York), 1993.

Highlights
Alan Alda on the last episode and the shooting of the last scene shot of M*A*S*H
02:07
Larry Gelbart on first being approached by Gene Reynolds to adapt the movie M*A*S*H into a television series; on his agreement with Reynolds that it remain true to the film version
04:32
Jamie Farr on his character, "Klinger" on M*A*S*H
02:22
Fred Silverman on the relatively straightforward development of M*A*S*H and on the pilot being the "best" Silverman had ever seen, and on making good scheduling decisions with the assistance of CBS-TV President Robert D. Wood
02:15
Elias Davis and David Pollock on the legacy of M*A*S*H  and its creator Larry Gelbart
06:26
Walter Dishell on how the M*A*S*H writers "got it"
02:59
Who talked about this show

Alan Alda

View Interview
Alan Alda on the process of learning lines with the ensemble cast of M*A*S*H and the importance of laughter with fellow actors
05:08
Alan Alda on the relationship between the writers and the actors on M*A*S*H, as facilitated by director Gene Reynolds
03:46
Alan Alda on his fidelity to Larry Gelbart's script to the extent that he spoke a typo on M*A*S*H: "Larry wrote it, so I said it"
02:18
Alan Alda on the way improvisation was incorporated into the classic M*A*S*H episode "The Interview"
01:46
Alan Alda on the approach of making a comedy show about war in developing M*A*S*H
04:36
Alan Alda on the way Larry Gelbart got around the censors to use the word "virgin" in an episode of M*A*S*H
01:14
Alan Alda on the research done on M*A*S*H
00:32
Alan Alda on the network's objection to the sight of a jock strap on an episode of M*A*S*H
01:48
Alan Alda on his M*A*S*H character, "Hawkeye" Pierce
02:59
Alan Alda on getting shots just as the sun set while directing M*A*S*H
01:51
Alan Alda on his impressions of M*A*S*H producer Gene Reynolds
02:29
Alan Alda on M*A*S*H show creator/writer Larry Gelbart
01:39
Alan Alda on the philosophy behind adding new characters to M*A*S*H
00:41
Alan Alda on M*A*S*H executive producer Burt Metcalfe
01:09
Alan Alda on working out a scene with Wayne Rogers on M*A*S*H, after shooting for the satisfaction of getting it right
01:43
Alan Alda on Loretta Swit's contribution to making her M*A*S*H character three-dimensional.
01:37
Alan Alda on working with Harry Morgan on M*A*S*H, and Morgan's sense of humor
01:28
Alan Alda on the M*A*S*H episode "Sometimes You Hear the Bullet"-- its dramatic significance and Alda's critique of a scene in which he cries on camera
01:23
Alan Alda on writing the M*A*S*H episode "Dear Sigmund" and the performance of Allan Arbus as "Major Sidney Freedman"
02:14
Alan Alda on the M*A*S*H episode "Inga"
01:07
Alan Alda on the content and the shooting of the last scene shot of M*A*S*H
04:03
Alan Alda on the M*A*S*H finale
02:14
Alan Alda on how CBS believed in M*A*S*H despite initial low ratings
00:58
Alan Alda on why M*A*S*H was a successful television show
02:04

Larry Auerbach

View Interview
Larry Auerbach on representing Alan Alda
02:40
Larry Auerbach on the final episode of M*A*S*H: "Goodbye, Farewell, and Amen"
01:49

Bruce Bilson

View Interview
Bruce Bilson on directing one episode of M*A*S*H "Bananas Crackers and Nuts" (airdate:November 5, 1972)
01:26

Allan Burns

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Allan Burns on Gene Reynolds' style on M*A*S*H
00:36

Thomas Carter

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Thomas Carter on appearing on M*A*S*H
00:36

Les Charles

View Interview
Glen and Les Charles on writing a spec script for M*A*S*H, which was the first script they sold 
05:30

Glen Charles

View Interview
Glen and Les Charles on writing a spec script for M*A*S*H, which was the first script they sold 
05:30

Elias Davis

View Interview
Elias Davis and David Pollock on how they came to write for M*A*S*H
05:17
Elias Davis and David Pollock on rewriting scripts for M*A*S*H
03:17
Elias Davis and David Pollock on the writers' room of M*A*S*H
03:35
Elias Davis and David Pollock on the research that went in to writing stories for M*A*S*H and using military and medical jargon in the scripts
07:25
Elias Davis and David Pollock on keeping M*A*S*H fresh
06:42
Elias Davis and David Pollock on writing the M*A*S*H final episode "Goodbye, Farewell, and Amen"
03:42
Elias Davis and David Pollock on the legacy of M*A*S*H  and its creator Larry Gelbart
06:26

Walter Dishell

View Interview
Walter Dishell on how he came to be involved with M*A*S*H
03:20
Walter Dishell on the film version of M*A*S*H
01:39
Walter Dishell on doing research for M*A*S*H
03:21
Walter Dishell on advising on how to perform surgery in M*A*S*H
02:34
Walter Dishell on the opening triage scene in M*A*S*H
00:49
Walter Dishell on the challenge of making the doctors on M*A*S*H funny but credible
01:50
Walter Dishell on the research necessary for the medical scenes in M*A*S*H
04:11
Walter Dishell on how the M*A*S*H writers "got it"
04:20
Walter Dishell on different medical techniques used on M*A*S*H
04:00
Walter Dishell on co-writing the M*A*S*H episode "Life Time" with Alan Alda
07:37
Walter Dishell on Wayne Rogers and "Dr. 'Trapper' John McIntyre" on M*A*S*H
01:39
Walter Dishell on Loretta Swit as "Major Margaret Houlihan" on M*A*S*H
01:07
Walter Dishell on McLean Stevenson as "Col Henry Blake" on M*A*S*H
01:25
Walter Dishell on Jamie Farr as "Corporal Max Klinger" on M*A*S*H
01:47
Walter Dishell on Mike Farrell as "Captain BJ Hunnicut" on M*A*S*H
02:02
Walter Dishell on David Ogden Stires as "Major Charles Emerson Winchester" on M*A*S*H
01:01
Walter Dishell on a typical work week on M*A*S*H
02:12
Walter Dishell on M*A*S*H's use of laugh track
00:55
Walter Dishell on his memories of M*A*S*H  episodes
01:51
Walter Dishell on M*A*S*H: "Goodbye, Farewell, and Amen"
01:19
Walter Dishell on the use of blood on M*A*S*H
01:02

Charles Dubin

View Interview
Charles S. Dubin on how he came to direct M*A*S*H
03:10
Charles S. Dubin on a typical workweek directing an episode of M*A*S*H, and on the research involved in making the series
02:04
Charles S. Dubin on directing Alan Alda as "Hawkeye Pierce" on M*A*S*H
04:10
Charles S. Dubin on directing Harry Morgan as "Sherman T. Potter" on M*A*S*H
03:28
Charles S. Dubin on directing Gary Burghoff as "Radar O'Reilly" on M*A*S*H
02:26
Charles S. Dubin on directing Loretta Swit as "Margaret Houlihan" on M*A*S*H
02:36
Charles S. Dubin on directing William Christopher as "Father Mulcahy," Jamie Farr as "Max Klinger," Larry Linville as "Frank Burns," Mike Farrell as "B.J. Hunnicutt," and David Ogden Stiers as "Charles Winchester" on M*A*S*H
05:04
Charles S. Dubin on directing the M*A*S*H episode "Point of View"
02:42
Charles S. Dubin on directing the M*A*S*H episode "Point of View"
03:26
Charles S. Dubin on working with Burt Metcalfe and Gene Reynolds on M*A*S*H
01:34
Charles S. Dubin on where M*A*S*H was shot
02:20
Charles S. Dubin on problems Standards and Practices had with M*A*S*H and on the use of the laugh track on the show
01:26
Charles S. Dubin on the popularity of M*A*S*H, and on the end of the series and its legacy
02:33

Jamie Farr

View Interview
Jamie Farr on his role on The Red Skelton Show being similar to his role on M*A*S*H
02:02
Jamie Farr on how Hy Averback played a role in getting Farr a role on M*A*S*H
06:35
Jamie Farr on the premise of M*A*S*H; on the scripts and characters; on his role as "Maxwell Q. Klinger"
20:44
Jamie Farr on cross-dressing as "Klinger" on M*A*S*H and reaction from fans from the "Big Mac" episode
01:50
Jamie Farr on his character, "Klinger" on M*A*S*H
10:00
Jamie Farr on the filming of the finale of M*A*S*H and creating a real time capsule
04:25
Jamie Farr on his character, "Klinger's" roots on M*A*S*H (contd.) and his character traits
06:04
Jamie Farr on the M*A*S*H episode "The Interview"
00:26
Jamie Farr on the M*A*S*H episode "The Interview"
01:20
Jamie Farr on a typical production week on M*A*S*H; on the cast and crew
09:42
Jamie Farr on the M*A*S*H episode "The Interview"
01:03
Jamie Farr on favorite scenes from M*A*S*H episodes
03:11
Jamie Farr on directing an episode of M*A*S*H 
01:41
Jamie Farr on M*A*S*H coming to an end and the ratings of the final episode and the show's ongoing popularity and legacy
07:30
Jamie Farr on negotiating a raise on M*A*S*H
04:04

Eddie Foy, III

View Interview
Eddie Foy III on casting the feature film version of M*A*S*H
01:41
Eddie Foy III on casting the pilot for M*A*S*H
03:38
Eddie Foy III on working with Larry Gelbart and Gene Reynolds on M*A*S*H
03:20

Larry Gelbart

View Interview
Larry Gelbart on first being approached by Gene Reynolds to adapt the movie M*A*S*H into a television series; on his agreement with Reynolds that it remain true to the film version
04:32
Larry Gelbart on doing research for writing M*A*S*H; learning from real doctors, nurses, pilots in Korea and using real dialogue and stories in the series
01:52
Larry Gelbart on writing the pilot for M*A*S*H in just two days, the initial reception from the network CBS
01:47
Larry Gelbart on casting Alan Alda on M*A*S*H 
01:11
Larry Gelbart on keeping CBS happy with the budget for M*A*S*H  in return for little interference from the network on the major themes
01:59
Larry Gelbart on balancing CBS's concerns and censorship issues on M*A*S*H ; specifically with the "virgin" episode 
01:54
Larry Gelbart on an infamous script written by Stanley Ralph Ross that was the only one to get rejected by CBS in the entire run of M*A*S*H
00:44
Larry Gelbart on the challenges of putting together an episode of M*A*S*H and how he and Gene Reynolds worked together
03:45
Larry Gelbart on the choice to shoot M*A*S*H as single-camera to give it a film quality and more naturalistic performances
00:28
Larry Gelbart on his fight to keep the laugh track off of M*A*S*H, which he bascially lost
02:09
Larry Gelbart on Alan Alda's committment to his role on M*A*S*H and how he would show what he wanted rather than argue a point
03:54
Larry Gelbart on the talented cast of M*A*S*H
06:24
Larry Gelbart on the casting of Jamie Farr as "Klinger" on M*A*S*H
02:25
Larry Gelbart on the episode "Abyssinia, Henry" of where one of the main characters dies which they kept a secret from cast and crew; and the response to the episode; Gelbart explains  "M*A*S*H was not all happy endings"
09:58
Larry Gelbart on how "The Interview" was conceived, written, and created, on M*A*S*H
03:18
Larry Gelbart on how it was difficult for him to leave the show after being so involved with it for many years
02:13
Larry Gelbart on how he feels lucky to have had the opportunity to have a soap box on national television with  M*A*S*H where he could speak his mind
01:08

Everett Greenbaum

View Interview
Everett Greenbaum on how he came to write for M*A*S*H
01:27
Everett Greenbaum on writing for M*A*S*H
02:47
Everett Greenbaum on favorite M*A*S*H memories
02:45
Everett Greenbaum on coming up with story ideas for M*A*S*H
04:36
Everett Greenbaum on the cast of M*A*S*H
03:40
Everett Greenbaum on McLean Stevenson leaving M*A*S*H
01:43
Everett Greenbaum on the characters of M*A*S*H
01:29
Everett Greenbaum on how writing for M*A*S*H was different from other sitcoms
02:23
Everett Greenbaum on the changes in M*A*S*H over the years
02:32
Everett Greenbaum on the death of "Col Henry Blake" on M*A*S*H
01:45
Everett Greenbaum on the M*A*S*H finale "Goodbye, Farewell and Amen"
01:32

Leslie Hoffman

View Interview
Leslie Hoffman on doing stunts for M*A*S*H
01:02
Leslie Hoffman on performing stunts for M*A*S*H  and the atmosphere on set
02:40

Ron Howard

View Interview
Ron Howard on his guest-starring role on M*A*S*H in the episode "Sometimes You Hear the Bullet"
00:52

David Isaacs

View Interview
Ken Levine and David Isaacs on being nominated for an Emmy for the M*A*S*H episode, "Point of View"
00:27
Ken Levine and David Isaacs on how they came to write for M*A*S*H
02:09
Ken Levine and David Isaacs on writing the drama of M*A*S*H
02:12
Ken Levine and David Isaacs on doing the medical and military research for M*A*S*H
03:46
Ken Levine and David Isaacs on being brought on staff to write for M*A*S*H and the M*A*S*H writers' room
03:49
Ken Levine and David Isaacs on the challenge of writing for established characters on M*A*S*H
02:25
Ken Levine and David Isaacs on "Hawkeye Pierce," played by Alan Alda, and "Max Klinger," played by Jamie Farr, being their favorite M*A*S*H characters to write for
01:28
Ken Levine and David Isaacs on writing the M*A*S*H episode, "Our Finest Hour"
02:29
Ken Levine and David Isaacs on writing the M*A*S*H episode, "Point of View"
02:55
Ken Levine and David Isaacs on how the various cast changes affected M*A*S*H
02:20
Ken Levine and David Isaacs on moving on from M*A*S*H in 1979
01:29
Ken Levine and David Isaacs on the legacy of M*A*S*H
01:35

Ring Lardner, Jr.

View Interview
Ring Lardner, Jr. on writing the feature film "MASH" which led to the television series M*A*S*H, and on working with director Robert Altman
09:07

Ken Levine

View Interview
Ken Levine and David Isaacs on "Hawkeye Pierce," played by Alan Alda, and "Max Klinger," played by Jamie Farr, being their favorite M*A*S*H  characters to write for
01:28
Ken Levine and David Isaacs on how they came to write for M*A*S*H
02:09
Ken Levine and David Isaacs on writing the drama of M*A*S*H
02:12
Ken Levine and David Isaacs on doing the medical and military research for M*A*S*H
03:46
Ken Levine and David Isaacs on being brought on staff to write for M*A*S*H and the M*A*S*H writers' room
03:49
Ken Levine and David Isaacs on the challenge of writing for established characters on M*A*S*H
02:25
Ken Levine and David Isaacs on writing the M*A*S*H episode, "Our Finest Hour"
02:29
Ken Levine and David Isaacs on writing the M*A*S*H episode, "Point of View"
02:55
Ken Levine and David Isaacs on being nominated for an Emmy for the M*A*S*H episode, "Point of View" 
00:27
Ken Levine and David Isaacs on how the various cast changes affected M*A*S*H
02:20
Ken Levine and David Isaacs on moving on from M*A*S*H in 1979 
01:29
Ken Levine and David Isaacs on the legacy of M*A*S*H
01:35

Burt Metcalfe

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Burt Metcalfe on how he came be an associate producer for M*A*S*H
02:38
Burt Metcalfe on casting M*A*S*H  
18:29
Burt Metcalfe on shooting the pilot for M*A*S*H  
02:01
Burt Metcalfe on casting Larry Linville as "Major Frank Burns" on M*A*S*H
01:45
Burt Metcalfe on casting William Christopher as "Father Francis Mulcahy" on M*A*S*H
05:56
Burt Metcalfe on casting Loretta Swit as "Major Margaret Houlihan" on M*A*S*H
02:30
Burt Metcalfe on the pilot for M*A*S*H
04:12
Burt Metcalfe on the research that was done to prepare for M*A*S*H
09:56
Burt Metcalfe on how M*A*S*H related to Vietnam
01:47
Burt Metcalfe on CBS's edicts about showing blood in M*A*S*H
02:07
Burt Metcalfe on the laugh track in M*A*S*H
02:04
Burt Metcalfe on the dramatic elements of M*A*S*H
02:30
On show creator Larry Gelbart's importance to M*A*S*H
02:51
Burt Metcalfe on Gene Reynolds' contribution to M*A*S*H
01:36
Burt Metcalfe on how his position on M*A*S*H changed over the years
04:05
Burt Metcalfe on Alan Alda's contributions to M*A*S*H
07:43
Burt Metcalfe on Wayne Rogers as "Captain 'Trapper' John McIntyre" on M*A*S*H
02:38
Burt Metcalfe on McLean Stevenson as "Col Henry Blake" on M*A*S*H
01:25
Burt Metcalfe on Harry Morgan as "Col Sherman T. Potter" on M*A*S*H
02:36
Burt Metcalfe on Mike Farrell as Captian B.J. Hunnicut on M*A*S*H
06:09
Burt Metcalfe on Loretta Swit as "Major Margaret Houlihan" on M*A*S*H
02:54
Burt Metcalfe on William Christopher as "Father Francis Mulcahy" on M*A*S*H
03:01
Burt Metcalfe on the hour-long season seven episode of M*A*S*H: "Our Finest Hour" inspired by season four's "The Interview"
01:23
Burt Metcalfe on the M*A*S*H episode "Holy Mess"
01:57
Burt Metcalfe on the death of "Col Henry Blake" on M*A*S*H
04:39
Burt Metcalfe on directing the M*A*S*H episode "A War For All Seasons"
03:35
Burt Metcalfe on directing and co-writing the M*A*S*H episode "The Party"
04:45
Burt Metcalfe on Jamie Farr as "Corporal Max Klinger" on M*A*S*H
02:56
Burt Metcalfe on Gary Burghoff as "Walter 'Radar' O'Reilly" on M*A*S*H
01:22
Burt Metcalfe on David Ogden Stiers as "Major Charles Emerson Winchester" on M*A*S*H
02:33
Burt Metcalfe on the next-to-last M*A*S*H  episode "As Time Goes By"
04:18
Burt Metcalfe on the M*A*S*H episode "Point of View"
02:59
Burt Metcalfe on Standards and Practices and M*A*S*H
02:39
Burt Metcalfe on the M*A*S*H finale "Goodbye, Farewell, and Amen"
09:54
Burt Metcalfe on writing the M*A*S*H finale "Goodbye, Farewell, and Amen"
04:48
Burt Metcalfe on the commercial and critical reaction to the M*A*S*H  finale "Goodbye, Farewell, and Amen"
00:55
Burt Metcalfe on the reception of the M*A*S*H finale "Goodbye, Farewell, and Amen"
02:04
Burt Metcalfe on watching the M*A*S*H  finale "Goodbye, Farewell, and Amen"
01:45

Harry Morgan

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Harry Morgan on joining M*A*S*H; on his character, Colonel Sherman Potter
14:19
Harry Morgan on his co-stars on M*A*S*H; on the characters and the comedy of the series
28:44
Actor Harry Morgan briefly on the experience of doing the classic M*A*S*H episode "The Interview"
00:35
Actor Harry Morgan on co-stars and specific episodes of M*A*S*H
21:16

Pat Morita

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Pat Morita on his guest role on M*A*S*H
01:32

Thad Mumford

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Dan Wilcox and Thad Mumford on writing for M*A*S*H
03:21
Dan Wilcox and Thad Mumford on writing the M*A*S*H finale "Goodbye, Farewell, and Amen"
04:32

Horace Newcomb

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Horace Newcomb on M*A*S*H
01:20

David Pollock

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Elias Davis and David Pollock on how they came to write for M*A*S*H
05:17
Elias Davis and David Pollock on rewriting scripts for M*A*S*H
03:17
Elias Davis and David Pollock on the writers' room of M*A*S*H
03:35
Elias Davis and David Pollock on the research that went in to writing stories for M*A*S*H and using military and medical jargon in the scripts
07:25
Elias Davis and David Pollock on keeping M*A*S*H fresh
06:42
Elias Davis and David Pollock on writing the M*A*S*H final episode "Goodbye, Farewell, and Amen"
03:42
Elias Davis and David Pollock on the legacy of M*A*S*H and its creator Larry Gelbart
06:26

Carroll Pratt

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Carroll Pratt on tailoring a laugh track to a show, using M*A*S*H as an example
02:29

Gene Reynolds

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Gene Reynolds on casting Alan Alda as "Hawkeye Pierce" on M*A*S*H
04:56
Gene Reynolds on the theme song to M*A*S*H, "Suicide is Painless"
01:58
Gene Reynolds on the M*A*S*H episode "Point of View"
01:26
Gene Reynolds on how M*A*S*H came about as a TV series
03:22
Gene Reynolds on casting M*A*S*H with Bert Metcalf
01:24
Gene Reynolds on the premise of M*A*S*H
05:22
Gene Reynolds on traveling to Korea with Larry Gelbart to do research for M*A*S*H
01:46
Gene Reynolds on the characters of M*A*S*H
03:21
Gene Reynolds on Wayne Rogers as "Trapper John" on M*A*S*H
00:50
Gene Reynolds on Loretta Swit as "Margaret Houlihan" on M*A*S*H
01:57
Gene Reynolds on Gary Burghoff as "Radar O'Reilly" on M*A*S*H
00:38
Gene Reynolds on McLean Stevenson as "Henry Blake" on M*A*S*H
01:40
Gene Reynolds on killing off "Henry Blake" on M*A*S*H
04:53
Gene Reynolds on William Christopher as "Father Mulcahy" on M*A*S*H
00:54
Gene Reynolds on the casting of Jamie Farr as "Max Klinger" on M*A*S*H
02:58
Gene Reynolds on Harry Morgan as "Sherman T. Potter" on M*A*S*H
01:21
Gene Reynolds on Mike Farrell as "BJ Hunnicut" on M*A*S*H
00:21
Gene Reynolds on dropping certain characters on M*A*S*H
01:00
Gene Reynolds on shooting the pilot of M*A*S*H
02:39
Gene Reynolds on the early ratings for M*A*S*H
00:42
Gene Reynolds on the writing team of M*A*S*H
03:12
Gene Reynolds on Alan Alda writing for M*A*S*H
01:20
Gene Reynolds on a typical production week for M*A*S*H
01:12
Gene Reynolds on the directors of M*A*S*H
01:12
Gene Reynolds on Bert Metcalf as showrunner on M*A*S*H
01:18
Gene Reynolds on executive producing M*A*S*H
01:11
Gene Reynolds on using the laugh track for M*A*S*H
01:30
Gene Reynolds on the M*A*S*H episode "Adam's Ribs"
00:52
Gene Reynolds on classic M*A*S*H episodes
03:01
Gene Reynolds on what Alan Alda brought to M*A*S*H
00:55
Gene Reynolds on the lack of official military involvement with M*A*S*H
00:59
Gene Reynolds on the M*A*S*H episode "Sometimes You Hear The Bullet"
04:00
Gene Reynolds on the popularity of M*A*S*H
02:06
Gene Reynolds on M*A*S*H in regards to Vietnam
01:57
Gene Reynolds on balancing the comedy and the drama on M*A*S*H 
01:34
Gene Reynolds on leaving M*A*S*H
01:31
Gene Reynolds on the final episode of M*A*S*H
02:35
Gene Reynolds on the legacy of M*A*S*H
02:06
Gene Reynolds on classic M*A*S*H episode "The Interview"
04:45

Sol Saks

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Writer Sol Saks on regretting that he had not stayed longer in his executive position at CBS (in comedy programming), so that he might have overseen M*A*S*H
01:06

Jay Sandrich

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Jay Sandrich on how Gene Reynolds and Alan Alda had to fight the network to keep the laugh track off of M*A*S*H
00:26

James Sheldon

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James Sheldon on directing Anna and the King, and being reassigned to direct M*A*S* H instead
01:14

Fred Silverman

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Fred Silverman on the relatively straightforward development of M*A*S*H and on the pilot being the "best" Silverman had ever seen, and on making good scheduling decisions with the assistance of CBS-TV President Robert D. Wood
02:15
Fred Silverman on M*A*S*H writer and producer Larry Gelbart, and Silverman's push for a subtle laugh track, a "chuckle track," for the show
02:01
Fred Silverman on M*A*S*H  and how Standards and Practices reacted to the show
01:02
Fred Silverman on the lasting appeal of M*A*S*H 
00:53

Loretta Swit

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Loretta Swit on her M.A.S.H character "Margaret Houlihan": "the best damn nurse" and on her character's relationship with "Frank Burns"
Loretta Swit on the M.A.S.H episode "Comrades in Arms," written by Alan Alda in which the relationship between "Hawkeye "and "Major Houlihan" takes a dramatic turn 
02:36
Loretta Swit on the legacy of M.A.S.H
Loretta Swit on how she landed the role of "Margaret Houlihan" on M.A.S.H - she was worried they would pass on her because she didn't have any comedy experience
Loretta Swit on filming the pilot of M.A.S.H
Loretta Swit on women's role in wartime as portrayed on M.A.S.H
Loretta Swit on the M.A.S.H episode "The Nurses," directed by Joan Darling
Loretta Swit on the M.A.S.H episode "Dreams," written by Alan Alda
Loretta Swit on MacLean Stevenson leaving M.A.S.H and Harry Morgan joining the cast
Loretta Swit on McLean Stevenson's character being killed in the M.A.S.H series and the audience's reaction; on the opportunity for the show to express "war is hell"
Loretta Swit on the filming of the last episode of M.A.S.H, "Time Capsule"

Jeffrey Tambor

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Jeffrey Tambor on appearing on M*A*S*H
00:30

William Tankersley

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William Tankersley on CBS Standards & Practices' work with M*A*S*H
00:43

Stanford Tischler

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Stanford Tischler on the classic M*A*S*H episode "The Interview"
00:56
Stanford Tischler on assembling the opening titles shots for M*A*S*H 
00:55
Stanford Tischler on the tone of M*A*S*H and its message
01:55
Stanford Tischler on getting hired on M*A*S*H and his experience editing the pilot
02:53
Stanford Tischler on the challenges of editing M*A*S*H 
00:53
Stanford Tischler on Larry Gelbart's penchant for "fixes" on M*A*S*H  
01:04
Stanford Tischler on working with executive producer Gene Reynolds on M*A*S*H  
00:28
Stanford Tischler on Larry Gelbart's talents on M*A*S*H  
00:33
Stanford Tischler on the laugh track on M*A*S*H  
01:01
Stanford Tischler on working with executive producer Burt Metcalfe on M*A*S*H  
00:29
Stanford Tischler on a typical work week on M*A*S*H  
01:58
Stanford Tischler on the overlapping of episodes in production on M*A*S*H  
01:32
Stanford Tischler on becoming an associate producer on M*A*S*H  
00:24
Stanford Tischler on working with M*A*S*H star Alda Alda
00:40
Stanford Tischler on working with M*A*S*H star McLean Stevenson
01:39
Stanford Tischler on the classic M*A*S*H episode "Abyssinia, Henry" and when he was informed about the show's ending
01:13
Stanford Tischler on being on the set of M*A*S*H
00:22
Stanford Tischler on not laughing while screening dailies with cast and crew because he was concentrating on his work on M*A*S*H
00:57
Stanford Tischler on winning an Emmy for editing M*A*S*H
00:39
Stanford Tischler on being proud of his work editing M*A*S*H
00:32
Stanford Tischler on editing the blooper reels for M*A*S*H
00:52
Stanford Tischler on the M*A*S*H episode "Point of View"
00:51
Stanford Tischler on the M*A*S*H episode "Old Soldiers" with a moving speech by Harry Morgan
00:51
Stanford Tischler on the classic M*A*S*H episode "Life Time," shown in real time, and how it compared to the 1949 feature film The Set-Up that he worked on, which was also presented in real time
01:18
Stanford Tischler on the M*A*S*H episode "Dreams" and censorship issues on the show
02:13
Stanford Tischler on the high standard for quality on M*A*S*H
00:33
Stanford Tischler the M*A*S*H series finale, and how he noticed that the streets were empty while it aired
02:31
Stanford Tischler on the legacy of M*A*S*H
00:48
Stanford Tischler on how actor Harry Morgan disliked performing the racist moment required of his character in his guest appearance on M*A*S*H in "The General Flipped at Dawn" (which preceded his regular role)
01:24
Stanford Tischler on M*A*S*H as his proudest career achievement
00:28
Stanford Tischler on photos from his time editing M*A*S*H
02:18

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