Homicide: Life on the Street


The Academy of Television Arts & Sciences Foundation Presents

02:26

Tabs

About

From Wikipedia:

Homicide: Life on the Street is an American police procedural television series chronicling the work of a fictional version of the Baltimore Police Department's Homicide Unit. It ran for seven seasons (122 episodes) on NBC from 1993 to 1999, and was succeeded by a TV movie, which also acted as the de facto series finale. The series was originally based on David Simon's book "Homicide: A Year on the Killing Streets." Many of the characters and stories used throughout the show were based on events depicted in the book, which was also part of the basis for Simon's own series, The Wire on HBO.

Although Homicide featured an ensemble cast, Andre Braugher emerged as the series' breakout star through his portrayal of Frank Pembleton. The show won Television Critics Association Awards for Outstanding Achievement in Drama in 1996, 1997, and 1998. It also became the first drama ever to win three Peabody Awards for best drama in 1993, 1995, and 1997. In 1997, the episode "Prison Riot" was ranked No. 32 on TV Guide's 100 Greatest Episodes of All Time. In 2007, it was listed as one of Time magazine's "Best TV Shows of All-TIME." In 1996 TV Guide named the series 'The Best Show You're Not Watching'. The show placed #46 on Entertainment Weekly's "New TV Classics" list.

The show inspired the spin-off Homicide: Second Shift, which was shown exclusively online.

Homicide: Life on the Street was adapted from "Homicide: A Year on the Killing Streets," a non-fiction book by Baltimore Sun reporter David Simon, based on his experience following a Baltimore Police Department homicide unit. Simon, who became a consultant and producer with the series, said he was particularly interested in the demythification of the American detective. While detectives are typically portrayed as noble characters who care deeply about their victims, Simon believed real detectives regarded violence as a normal aspect of their jobs. Simon sent the book to film director and Baltimore native Barry Levinson with the hopes that it would be adapted into a film, but Levinson thought it would be more appropriate material for television because the stories and characters could be developed over a longer period of time. Levinson believed a television adaptation would bring a fresh and original edge to the police drama genre because the book exploded many of the myths of the police drama genre by highlighting that cops did not always get along with each other, and that criminals occasionally got away with their crimes. Levinson approached screenwriter Paul Attanasio with the material, and Homicide became Attanasio's first foray into television writing. Subsequently, all episodes of Homicide display the credit, "Created by Paul Attanasio" at the end of their opening sequence, a credit which both Eric Overmyer and James Yoshimura dispute on the DVD audio commentary to the season 5 episode, "The Documentary," claiming instead the show was created by Tom Fontana and Yoshimura. The series title was originally Homicide: A Year on the Killing Streets, but NBC changed it so that viewers would not believe it was limited to a single year; the network also believed the use of the term "life" would be more reaffirming than the term "killing streets." The opening theme music was composed by Baltimore native, Lynn F. Kowal, a graduate of the Peabody Institute of the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore.

Highlights
Tom Fontana on how Homicide: Life on the Street came about
04:08
Timothy Van Patten on Bruce Paltrow and directing Homicide: Life on the Street
03:28
Tom Fontana on filming Homicide: Life on the Street in Baltimore 
03:31
Warren Littlefield on becoming President of NBC Entertainment and his approach to dramas
03:32
Who talked about this show

Edie Falco

View Interview
Edie Falco on appearing on Homicide: Life on the Street
01:14

Tom Fontana

View Interview
Tom Fontana on how Homicide: Life on the Street came about
04:08
Tom Fontana on filming Homicide: Life on the Street in Baltimore 
03:31
Tom Fontana on network reaction to Homicide: Life on the Street
05:55
Tom Fontana on Robin Williams guest-starring on Homicide: Life on the Street
00:40
Tom Fontana on the African-American response to Homicide: Life on the Street
00:51
Tom Fontana on working with David Simon on Homicide: Life on the Street and doing crossovers with various other shows
03:10
Tom Fontana on the cast of Homicide: Life on the Street
01:54
Tom Fontana on constructing the stories for Homicide: Life on the Street
05:40
Tom Fontana on the Homicide: Life on the Street episode "Three Men and Adena" and winning an Emmy Award for it
03:16
Tom Fontana on dealing with censorship issues and the head of Broadcast Standards at NBC during his time on Homicide: Life on the Street
03:14
Tom Fontana on working with Barry Levinson on Homicide: Life on the Street
01:48
Tom Fontana on the Homicide: Life on the Street episode "The Subway"
01:46
Tom Fontana on the end of Homicide: Life on the Street
03:43
Tom Fontana on the then-innovative Internet presence of Homicide: Life on the Street and using new media to supplement his subsequent shows
02:37

Vince Gilligan

View Interview
Vince Gilligan on an episode of Homicide: Life on the Street which influenced his X-Files script for the episode "Drive", guest-starring Bryan Cranston

Barry Levinson

View Interview
Barry Levinson on how he came to be the executive producer of Homicide: Life on the Street
04:34
Barry Levinson on directing the pilot of Homicide: Life on the Street
02:12
Barry Levinson on why he wanted to shoot Homicide: Life on the Street in Baltimore
00:46
Barry Levinson on the casting of Homicide: Life on the Street
01:04
Barry Levinson on the naturalistic manner of shooting Homicide: Life on the Street and his input into the editing style of the show
01:52
Barry Levinson on NBC's reaction to Homicide: Life on the Street and the one episode the network objected to
02:37
Barry Levinson on Richard Belzer's Homicide: Life on the Street character, "John Munch," being a crossover character with Law & Order: Special Victims Unit
01:19
Barry Levinson on Homicide: Life on the Street's web series: "Second Shift"
00:25
Barry Levinson on working with Tom Fontana on Homicide: Life on the Street
01:05
Barry Levinson on the end of Homicide: Life on the Street and the show's legacy
01:18

Warren Littlefield

View Interview
Warren Littlefield on becoming President of NBC Entertainment and his approach to dramas
03:32

Jayne Meadows

View Interview
Jayne Meadows on guest-starring on Homicide: Life on the Street
00:59

Timothy Van Patten

View Interview
Timothy Van Patten on Bruce Paltrow and directing Homicide: Life on the Street
03:28

All Shows

A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
J
L
M
P
R
S
T
W